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5.2 Child Protection Plans - Lead Social Worker Role and Responsibilities

See also: South West Child Protection Procedures for additional guidance.

AMENDMENT

This chapter was updated in August 2016 to reflect current departmental job titles and areas of responsibility.


It is important that the role of the lead social worker is fully explained at the Initial Child Protection Conference and at the Core Group.

At every initial conference, where a Child Protection Plan is put into place, the conference chair must name a qualified social worker, identified by the Team Manager/Assistant Team Manager, to fulfil the role of lead social worker for the child.

The lead social worker should complete the assessment of the child and family, securing contributions from core group members and others as necessary. They should co- ordinate the contribution of family members and other agencies to plan the actions which need to be taken, put the child protection plan into effect, and review progress against the planned outcomes set out in the plan. It is important that the role of the lead social worker is fully explained at the initial child protection conference and at the core group.

The Lead Social Worker should also regularly ascertain the child’s wishes and feelings, and keep the child up to date with the child protection plan and any developments or changes.

The lead social worker should:

  • Undertake visits to see the child in accordance with the child protection plan and minimum requirements;
  • Convene and identify the chair of the second and subsequent core group meetings (the first core group meeting having been chaired / led by their manager);
  • Identify which professional will provide a written record of meetings for all core group members and the Assistant Team Manager;
  • Ensure that the outline child protection plan is developed, in conjunction with members of the core group, into a detailed multi-agency protection plan;
  • Clearly note and include in the written record any areas of disagreement;
  • Obtain a full understanding of the family’s history, which must involve reading previous children’s social care files as well as current records in use in children’s social care, including those relating to other children who have been part of any households involving the current carers of the child. Additional information should be obtained from relevant other agencies and local authorities;
  • Complete the statutory assessment of the child and family, securing contributions / information from core group members and any other agencies with relevant information;
  • Co-ordinate the contribution of family members putting the plan into action and reviewing the objectives stated in the plan.

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